Research Monkeys

  • Aida

  • Alanna

  • Alas

  • Alaska

  • Alex

    Alex arrived at Jungle Friends when he was 30 years old. He was born at Wooster College in Ohio and was used in cognitive and behavioral research his entire life.

  • Angel

    Angel is a tufted capuchin, estimated to have been born in the 1980's and arriving at Jungle Friends on April 8th, 2005. Captured in the rainforest as a youngster, Angel was stolen from the freedom of his natural home and exported to the US where he was sold into research.

  • Arlette

    Arlette, named after her first sponsor, is one of 66 cotton-top tamarins retired to Jungle Friends after the closure of the lab where they lived their entire lives.

  • Aunt Gizmo

    Aunt Gizmo arrived at Jungle Friends when she was 30 years old. She was born at Wooster College in Ohio and was used in cognitive and behavioral research her entire life. Aunt Gizmo and her family friends Jake and Alex were able to retire to sunny Florida after the study ended.

  • Aunt Jake

    Aunt Jake arrived at Jungle Friends when she was 30 years old. She was born at Wooster College in Ohio and was used in cognitive and behavioral research her entire life. Aunt Jake and her brother Alex and family friend Aunt Gizmo were able to retire to sunny Florida after the study ended.

  • Bart

    Bart, along with 10 other cotton-top tamarins, arrived at Jungle Friends after the closure of the lab where they had previously lived.

  • Belle

  • Betsy

  • Blondie CT

    Blondie was one of 66 cotton-top tamarins retired to Jungle Friends after the closure of a major primate research lab where she was born.

  • Bloom

    Bloom was one of 66 cotton-top tamarins retired to Jungle Friends after the closure of a major research lab. Bloom and his partner were in the first group of 20 to come to their new sanctuary home.

  • Blue

  • Bluebell

  • Bocefus

  • Bongo

    Bongo was stolen from his rainforest home and family and sold into research where he lived for nearly two decades in a small lab cage – all alone. Fortunately, after the iron toxicity studies ended, Bongo and eight other tufted capuchins were retired to Jungle Friends Primate Sanctuary. Here, they all enjoy large, naturalistic outdoor habitats.

  • Booger

  • Captain Cuddles

  • Catman

  • CB

    CB is a tufted capuchin, estimated to have been born in the late 1980's and arriving at Jungle Friends on April 8th, 2005. Captured in the rainforest as a youngster, CB was stolen from his natural home and exported to the US where he was sold into research.

  • Chance

    Chance, named after our sanctuary manager who sponsored him, was among the first 20 of 66 cotton-top tamarins lucky enough to be retired to Jungle Friends after the closure of a major primate research lab.

  • Chet

  • Chewy

  • Chopin

    Chopin is a cotton-top tamarin who was born on June 5, 1999 and arrived at Jungle Friends on July 14, 2008 with nine other special-needs tamarins. These monkeys found a home at Jungle Friends when a research laboratory closed its doors.

  • Chris

    Chris lived with Xenon at the University of Georgia (UGA) lab and they now share a large outdoor habitat together.Chris has a big personality and will hang from the side of his habitat often upside down loudly demanding attention.Chris is very social and spends a lot of his day calling to the monkeys in neighboring habitats.

  • Diego

  • Dolores

    Dolores, along with 10 other cotton-top tamarins, was brought to Jungle Friends after the lab where they had previously been living closed its doors.

  • Don

    Don is also one of 66 cotton-top tamarins lucky enough to retire to Jungle Friends after the closure of a major primate research lab. Even luckier for Don, he was among the first group of 20 monkeys to join our Jungle Friends Family in Munchkinland!

  • Don King

    Don King and his friend Sloth were released from research in 2013 after spending more than 20 years in small cages. Don King spends most of his time flirting with the other monkeys around him -- many of whom were released from the same lab in 2004.

  • Don Knotts

    Don Knotts was captured in the rainforest as a youngster, stolen from his family and the freedom of his native home. Don Knotts was exported to the US where he was sold into iron toxicity research where he spent nearly two decades, in the laboratory – all alone in a small cage. Fortunately, after the studies ended, Don Knotts and eight other capuchins were retired to Jungle Friends Primate Sanctuary.

  • Dorry

  • Earl

    Earl was only four years old when he and his companion Earl arrived at Jungle Friends. These boys were bred and sold into research for medical studies; fortunately, the study was cancelled before they were 'used'. They narrowly escaped being sold to another laboratory!

  • Editto

  • Einstein

  • Elaine

  • Emma

  • Ernie Keebler

    Ernie arrived at Jungle Friends with four other male marmosets from a research laboratory, which had purchased the boys for use in iron toxicity research. When it was discovered that marmosets aren’t good models for such research, another researcher at the university wanted to use them for schizophrenia studies. Luckily, the boys were spared that fate and instead were allowed to move to Jungle Friends.

  • Esmeralda

    Esmeralda arrived in 2013 along with Raya after spending the first years of her life in vocal cord research. She loves being in her outdoor habitat, watching the wildlife around her!

  • Eve

  • Fawn

  • Floyd

    Floyd is a tufted capuchin, estimated to have been born in the late 1980's and arriving at Jungle Friends on April 8th, 2005. Captured in the rainforest as a youngster, Floyd was exported to the US and sold into research where he lived for nearly two decades.

  • Floyd CT

  • Flynn

  • Forrest

  • Gatsby

    Gatsby is a cotton-top tamarin who was born on February 5, 1998 and arrived at Jungle Friends on July 14, 2008 with nine other special-needs tamarins. These monkeys found a home at Jungle Friends when a research laboratory closed its doors.

  • George

  • Georgia

  • Gino

  • Golden Child

  • Goober

    Goober was captured in the rainforest as a youngster; Goober was stolen from the freedom of his natural home and exported to the US where he was sold into research. For nearly two decades, Goober lived in the laboratory, all alone in a small cage. Fortunately, after the study ended, Goober and eight other capuchins were retired to Jungle Friends Primate Sanctuary.

  • Gretel

  • Hawk

  • Hershey

    Hershey is a cotton-top tamarin who was born on February 25, 1996 and arrived at Jungle Friends on July 14, 2008 with nine other special-needs tamarins. These monkeys found a home at Jungle Friends when a research laboratory closed its doors.

  • Homer

  • Itchy

  • Jack

    Jack came from a lab along with his friends Manny and Moe.

  • Job

    Job was orphaned at three days old when his mother died of meningitis at the University of Georgia (UGA). Due to the loss of his mother, Job had to be human reared, which made him more “humanized” than the other six capuchins who arrived with him from UGA.

  • Joey

    Joey was just four years old when he arrived at Jungle Friends with his companion Earl. These boys were bred and sold into research for medical studies; fortunately, the study was cancelled before they were 'used'. They narrowly escaped being sold to another laboratory!

  • Juno

  • Kramer

  • Leo

    Leo and six other capuchins were retired to sunny Florida after spending their entire lives at the University of Georgia (UGA) lab. During his time at the lab Leo was known for mastering computer tasks quickly in all experiments.

  • Lindsey

    Lindsey, named after the callitrichids manager, AKA Mayor of Munchkinland, is one of the first 20 cotton-top tamarins to retire to Jungle Friends from a major primate research lab after it closed its doors.

  • Link

  • Lisa

  • Little CB

  • Maggie

  • Manny

    Manny came from a lab along with his friends Moe and Jack.

  • Manson

    Manson is a tufted capuchin, estimated to have been born in the late 1980's and arriving at Jungle Friends on April 8th, 2005. Captured in the rainforest as a youngster, Manson was exported to the US and sold into research where he lived for nearly two decades.

  • Michael

    Michael was four years old when he arrived at Jungle Friends with his companion Ringo. These boys were bred and sold into research for medical studies; fortunately, the study was cancelled before they were 'used'. They narrowly escaped being sold to another laboratory!

  • Micky

    Micky and six other capuchins were retired to sunny Florida after spending their entire lives at the University of Georgia (UGA) lab. When he arrived at Jungle Friends he was the palest of the UGA monkeys, but now he has a great tan to go with his little belly that has come along with his love of food.

  • Mila

  • Milhouse

  • Mitzi

    Mitzi is a very lucky 4-year-old common marmoset. Mitzi was bred for research and had been sent to a laboratory to be 'used' in biomedical research, but a change of course allowed her a bright future at Jungle Friends instead.

  • Moe

    Moe came from a lab along with his friends Manny and Jack.

  • Moreno

    Moreno arrived at Jungle Friends along with 19 other cotton-top tamarins. They were the first group out of 66 monkeys retired to the sanctuary after the closure of the major primate research lab where she’d lived her entire life.

  • Mr. Ed

    Mr. Ed, named after a Jungle Friends supporter, was one of 66 cotton-top tamarins retired to Jungle Friends after the closure of the primate research lab where he was born. Mr. Ed and his partner were among the first 20 cotton-top tamarins to join our Jungle Friends Family in Munchkinland.

  • Newman

  • Nick

    At the University of Georgia (UGA) lab, before he arrived at Jungle Friends, he learned to exchange tokens for treats, and he still does this. He often tries to trade monkey biscuits with his caregivers.

  • Nicor

    Nicor is a cotton-top tamarin who was born on June 5, 1999 and arrived at Jungle Friends on July 14, 2008 with nine other special-needs tamarins. These monkeys found a home at Jungle Friends when a research laboratory closed its doors.

  • Norman

  • Orsen

  • PC

    PC (short for 'Problem Child') was captured in the rainforest as a youngster, PC was stolen from the freedom of his natural home and exported to the US where he was sold into research. For nearly two decades, PC lived in the laboratory, housed indoors, alone in a small cage. Fortunately, after the iron toxicity studies ended, PC and eight other capuchins were retired to Jungle Friends.

  • Polly

  • Poppi

  • Raya

    Raya arrived in 2013 along with Esmeralda, still just a baby who was born in research. Raya quickly made friends with Zipper, who had been alone since his sweet companion Buttons passed away.

  • Regina

    Regina, named after her first sponsor, arrived at Jungle Friends along with 19 other cotton-top tamarins. They were the first group out of 66 monkeys retired to the sanctuary after the closure of the major primate research lab where she’d lived her entire life.

  • Ringo

    Ringo was four years old when he arrived at Jungle Friends with his monkey friend Michael. These boys were bred and sold into research for medical studies; fortunately, the study was cancelled before they were 'used'. They narrowly escaped being sold to another laboratory!

  • Rosa

  • Sailor

  • Scout

  • Silly Willy

  • Sir William

  • Sloth

    Sloth and his friend Don King were released from research in 2013 after spending more than 20 years in small cages. He got his name because he loved to hang upside down in his cage at the lab, but now that he has so much room to play he spends more time upright and sideways!

  • Snickers

    Snickers, named by his first sponsor, arrived at Jungle Friends along with 19 other cotton-top tamarins. They were the first group out of 66 monkeys retired to the sanctuary after the closure of the major primate research lab where he and his twin sister lived their entire lives.

  • Sylvia

  • Thea

  • Timber

  • Toad

  • Tom

    Tom, named after one of our board member’s sons, arrived at Jungle Friends along with 19 other cotton-top tamarins. They were in the first group of the 66 monkeys who were retired to the sanctuary after the closure of a major primate research lab.

  • Tuque

    Tuque and four other male marmosets were purchased to be used in iron toxicity studies, but when it was found that marmosets weren’t good models for such research, there was talk of using them in schizophrenia research instead! Luckily for the boys, that didn’t pan out and they were allowed to retire to Jungle Friends.

  • Twinkle

  • Wild Bill

    Wild Bill is a tufted capuchin, estimated to have been born in the late 1980's and arriving at Jungle Friends on April 8th, 2005. Captured in the rainforest as a youngster, Wild Bill was exported to the US and sold into research where he lived for nearly two decades.

  • Winthrop

  • Wren

  • Wynn

    Wynn arrived at Jungle Friends along with 19 other cotton-top tamarins. They were in the first group of the 66 monkeys who were retired to the sanctuary after a major primate research lab closed its doors.

  • Xavier

    Xavier is gentle and very friendly; he lives with his nephew Job. Of the seven University of Georgia monkeys to arrive at the sanctuary, Xavier is the most vocal at meal times -- he just loves to eat!

  • Xenon

    Xenon arrived from the University of Georgia (UGA) when they retired seven monkeys to sunny Florida. Xenon is incredibly smart and especially good at problem solving.

  • Yodel

  • Zack

    Zack, named after his sponsor’s son, arrived at Jungle Friends after the closure of the primate research lab where he had lived his entire life. He and his partner were among the first 20 monkeys to be retired to the sanctuary, and he’s now enjoying a great new life.

  • Zeke

    Zeke came to Jungle Friends with his brother – they are third generation descending from an original group of six capuchins that had come to live in a psychology laboratory at Wooster College during the 1970s.